Space

Collision with Mercury-like planet brought carbon and life to Earth

The origins of Carbon on Earth seems to be allied with a Mercury-like planet

Carbon is the core of the life of a planet, we all know this. But the question is –where did this carbon originate from? This issue has been a source of puzzlement for scientists for a longer time. But now a group of researchers from Rice University has found a convincing answer: the origination of carbon took place a due to a planetary crash which dates back 4.4 billion years.

A report submitted by Phys Org, named as ‘Nature Geoscience’ said that an accident amongst Earth and an embryonic planet like Mercury could have conveyed carbon to the globe. The existing carbon in Earth in those days ought to have bubbled or been caught in the center as opposed to being available in the mantle and biosphere to proliferate life.

The study was held by an Indian origin Rajdeep Dasgupta and his colleagues from Rice University in the US said that carbon derived from a massive crash between earth and Mercury-like planet before 4.4 billion years ago. Rajdeep and his team focused on studying how carbon-based life developed on Earth and the outcome is really a key one.

Researchers from Rice University say that around 4.4 billion years ago, a Mercury-like planet smashed into Earth, seeding our primordial planet with life-giving carbon. Had this never occurred, it’s an open question as to whether or not life could have ever emerged.
The proposed collision was so intense that Earth essentially absorbed the incoming proto-planet. (Image: Rajdeep Dasgupta). Researchers from Rice University say that around 4.4 billion years ago, a Mercury-like planet smashed into Earth, seeding our primordial planet with life-giving carbon. Had this never occurred, it’s an open question as to whether or not life could have ever emerged.

When asked Rajdeep about this research, he said, the challenge is to explain the origin of the volatile elements like carbon that remain outside the core in the mantle portion of our planet. We had published several studies that showed that even if carbon did not vaporize into space when the planet was mostly molten, it would end up in the metallic core of our planet because the iron-rich alloys there have a high affinity for carbon.

This study is continued from 2013 by Rajdeep and his friends, and the primary focus was to determine how sulfur or silicon alters the resemblance of iron for carbon.

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