Space

NASA is developing a new and efficient propulsion system for future missions to Moon and beyond

NASA is developing a new and efficient propulsion system for future missions to Moon and beyond

Mars is the most habitable planet out thereafter Earth and it has started yet another space race between NASA, SpaceX, and other space agencies. NASA has gone a step further in making the journey to the Mars a reality with a new technology which is ten times efficient than conventional chemical-based technology.

Known as Hall Thrusters, NASA along with Aerojet Rocketdyne has awarded a contract of 3 years worth $67 million where they are developing a technology called Advanced Electric Propulsion System (AEPS) or Hall Thrusters.

The new propulsion system combines electric and magnetic fields which are required to ionize gases such as xenon which are then expelled to produce thrust and it has worked during the initial phase successfully. The technology is ten times efficient than conventional chemical-based propulsion system although there are trade-offs such as lower acceleration and thrust on the flip side, using such energy source is much cleaner and environment-friendly.

According to Inquisitr, such a technology is currently in use in the space where the largest hall thruster develops around 4.5kilowatts of thrust while NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne are working on almost three-fold capacity of 13 kilowatts of thrust that would provide an immense and efficient propulsion towards the journey to the moon and even the red planet which is the ultimate destination. Elon Musk’s SpaceX is also working on its upcoming Mars mission and has already developed a crew module while other space companies such as Amazon’s Jeff Bezos Blue Origin is working on a similar program and not to neglect contributes of other spaceflight companies as well.

Around the World

The TeCake Staff

A team of writers hired in the house of The TeCake, which consists of journalists with broad, deep experience in print and online writing, publication and site management, news coverage, and editorial team management.

Add Comment

Click here to post a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You Might Also Like