Mysterious Clouds around the Milky Way Moving at an Unbelievable Pace

This year was very happening for the space researchers and scientists as a huge amount of space activities are recorded this year. From the evidence of extraterrestrial life to exoplanets, space events are taking place rapidly. Now one more news is the talking point for space enthusiasts the secret, extremely large clouds that are spinning around on the outskirts of the galaxy at an unbelievable pace.

Investigators have known about the presence of these high-velocity clouds which float around in the galactic halo, outside the sphere of the Milky Way for quite some time, but until now researchers did not have the instruments to map them out and inquire them indeed. The new research out of the International Center for Radio Astronomy Research, which has published the most precise maps of the clouds to date. This map overlays the whole sky and shows curious clouds of neutral hydrogen gas that are moving at a different speed to the regular rotation of the Milky Way.

The creator of the map Tobias Westmeier of the University of Western Australia said that these gas clouds are going towards or away from us at rates of up to a few hundred kilometres per second. The map was assembled by catching an image of the sky and disguising out gas that is driving at the same pace as the Milky Way to show the position of gas travelling at a variable speed. It resulted in what is believed to be the most sensitive and highest-resolution all-sky map of high-velocity clouds ever created. It shows the gas in great detail, exposing never-before-seen filaments, branches and clumps within the clouds. Westmeier said that starting to see all that structure within these high-velocity clouds is very interesting.

He added that it’s something that wasn’t apparent in the past, and it could give new hints about the source of these clouds and the physical conditions within them. The cause these clouds are so strange is that they move freely of and distinct from the rotational velocity of the universe itself, and their speed has been measured at between 43.5 to 56 miles per second. No-one understands why they are there or from where they came, but of course, there are hypotheses. Possibly the most extensive opinion is that the clouds are material that was residual from the formation of the galaxy, but such an approach still needs an evaluation of why the clouds move as they do. One sign is that the clouds have several compositions than what we typically find in the Milky Way, appearing to suggest that they share a separate origin from us. Even so, they cover about 13 percent of the night sky, so they are significant.

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