Software

Google responds on QuadRooter vulnerability, says most devices are protected

Check Point reported a Stagefright level security liability in Android devices running on Qualcomm chipsets. Fortunately, the security firm also offers solutions to a problem that could be plaguing 900 million mobile devices. ( Check Point | Google Play )
Check Point reported a Stagefright level security liability in Android devices running on Qualcomm chipsets. Fortunately, the security firm also offers solutions to a problem that could be plaguing 900 million mobile devices. ( Check Point | Google Play )

On the recently reported QuadRooter vulnerability, the search engine giant Google has responded that it is believed that more than 900 million Qualcomm chipset-powered Android devices, however, the company is aware of the fact and the majority of the handsets are protected against three of the security flaws pointed out, with the latest security patch.

In a statement, the tech giant said, “The fourth vulnerability, CVE-2016-5340, will be addressed in an upcoming Android security bulletin, though Android partners can take action sooner by referencing the public patch Qualcomm has provided.” The firm has added protections like Verify Apps and SafetyNet which block the snippets that choose to exploit vulnerabilities like QuadRooter.

This problem is found on the phones running on Qualcomm processors. Qualcomm processors’ QuadRooter has embodied four vulnerabilities, among which any of which can be triggered by hackers to hold the fort of any Smartphones. Simply saying, these four QuadRooter vulnerabilities can facilitate hackers the ability to take the complete power of a phone and unrestricted entrée to the stored information on the device. This also can allow the attackers to access into keylogging, GPS tracking, sensitive personal and enterprise data and recording video and audio, reported by Check Point in a blog post.

The first case of this issue came to the forefront in May, while it was found that millions of Android Smartphones running on Qualcomm processors are uncovered to a malfunction that can be easily attacked by web hackers to get access to the gadget.

The blog post also mentioned that hackers could set off any of these four vulnerabilities using a malicious app, and once the app is integrated with the vulnerabilities, it will not ask for any special permission access to the personal data.

Luckily for those who get anxious as soon as they hear about a cyber breach, Check Point devised a free scanner app called QuadRooter Scanner, and you can get it in the Google Play Store. It allows Android device owners to diagnose their devices and download patches to fix the specific issues.

About the author

Rishabh Rajvanshi

Rishabh, with six years of experience in the newspaper industry, has co-founded The TeCake in 2013. Apart from writing and editing articles on Technology at The TeCake, he also contributes to other esteemed newspapers.

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