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A research states that a virus named Acanthocystis Turfacea Chorella 1 (ATCV-1) was correlated with a “modest but statistically significant decrease in the performance on cognitive assessments of visual processing and visual motor speed” according to a study in PNAS.

The research also states that while taking throat, the virus swabs from 92 healthy individuals. 40 of those researched had the virus, and those 40 were worse in cognitive tests.

Study author Professor of Johns Hopkins medical school, Robert Yolken told, ‘We’re really just starting to find out what some of these agents that we’re carrying around might actually do.’

It’s the beginning, I think, of another way of looking at infectious agents — not agents that come in and do a lot of damage and then leave, like Ebola virus or influenza virus.’

This is kind of the other end of the spectrum. These are agents that we carry around for a long time and that may have subtle effects on our cognition and behaviour.’ Moreover, the researchers said that the ATCV-1 virus alters the genes the in the brain.

  • The virus- known as chlorovirus ATCV-1 was only known to appear in algae.
  • Researchers have not founded yet how it infected humans.
  • The virus didn’t affect swimmer, which were in direct contact with algae.
  • Instead humans could have been carrying virus, not known by researchers.
  • According to research, the virus alters genes in brain including memory and emotions.
  • Scientists found that 44 per cent of the people had this virus in their brains.

Professor James Van Etten, a biologist from the University of Nebraska who first identified the virus in algae 30 years ago, said: ‘There’s more and more studies showing that microorganisms in your body have a bigger influence than anything anyone would have predicted, and this could be something along those lines.’

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