'Invent, Discover and Make in India' than simply 'Make in India', Nobel Laureate
"Start teaching science in early primary school so that young people understand the world around them. It is a strategic plan. It takes years, 20 years, and 30 years. But if you continue to do it year after year, the future of India will be very, very bright," said Nobel Laureate Professor Dan Shechtman.

At the 103rd Indian Science Congress the present Nobel Laureates stated the country should shift their concern from the production of high-technology goods in India to the discovery and invention. The laureates were present for a session for interacting with media planned by the University of Mysore and laid emphasis on change of the slogan of Make In India to Invent, Discover and Make in India. With the motivation provided to the youth for taking up more interest in Pure Science and use it for their studies.

David J. Gross, Particle Physicist said that Making in India is obviously important for the country, but to make in India without dependence on others, you must invent in India, and to invent you must discover. Because it is discovery and inventions that lead to products that can be made. In today’s competitive world the country should make investment in Research and Development that has remained unchanged for the last 15 years, with the hike in budget allocation in the division will surely help. Nobel Laureate Professor Serge Haroche spoke regarding the attitude of borrowing inventions and make them in India must be performed.

Nobel Winners are impressed with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Make In India push, but have the feeling that some of the divisions are left out in execution. There are a lot of opportunities in the country in the Science division, but the education system needs enhanced investment that can be learned from the neighbouring countries added by them.

“Start teaching science in early primary school so that young people understand the world around them. It is a strategic plan. It takes years, 20 years, and 30 years. But if you continue to do it year after year, the future of India will be very, very bright,” said Nobel Prize Winner Professor Dan Shechtman.

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