Vitamin D can prevent age-related diseases

Sunbath for adults is essential for health as it may play a vital role in preventing age-related diseases later in life, suggests a new study. According to the research published in the Journal of Ageing and Gerontology, Vitamin D, primarily obtained from Sun can prevent chronic diseases linked with aging including depression, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline, high blood pressure, cancer and Type 2 diabetes.

Sue Penckofer, author of the study and professor at Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing (MNSON), addressed the fact that Vitamin D deficiency is common among adults these days since they mostly work indoors which results in several problems associated with Vitamin D and affects the health in older age.

Since our body can’t produce Vitamin D, thus it relies on external sources for the nutrient. Although Vitamin D supplements can fulfill the need to some extent but body need sunbath to fulfill the body demand. When rays coming from the sun collides with our skin, it produces Vitamin D.

The study authors said that at an older age Vitamin D deficiency magnifies and is hard to recover. Thus, people should start working out at an early age.

“Better understanding the relationship between Vitamin D and chronic diseases in older adults and whether treatment of Vitamin D deficiency can prevent or treat these disorders is important given the increasing number of people at risk for these health issues,” researcher Meghan Meehan from MNSON said.

According to the researchers, an adult up to 70 years of age should consume at least 600 IU of Vitamin D per day while people older than 70 years should take more than 800 IU of the nutrient daily.

While concluding, researcher said that Vitamin D supplements could also be used to prevent chronic diseases of ageing, however, one should know the proper dosage or it might affect adversely.

This isn’t the first study laying the importance on the consumption of Vitamin D. In previous study, researchers from the University of Turku Finland found that children with low Vitamin D level are likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease later in life.

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