Beware!  Those who consume too much salt in their food. Consuming high quantity of salt in one’s diet increases the risk of contracting kidney problems, according to a new research. The study found that high intake of sodium, nearly 4.7 grams a day, is related with increased risk of kidney related problems, and those patients were in need of frequent dialysis. However, low consumption of sodium showed no benefits while comparing it with moderate consumption, study said.

Lead author of the study, Andrew Smyth from the National University of Ireland, Galway, said, “Our findings extend the known benefits of healthy eating and show that the consumption of a healthy diet may protect from future major renal events.”

For the study, researchers involved 120 rural villages in China. They analysed their salt intake and kept surveillance on their kidney related diseases for 18 months under a sodium reduction programme. High intake of salt in daily diet not only initiated kidney related diseases, but it also triggered cardiovascular diseases.

“As dietary modification is a low-cost, simple intervention, it offers the potential to significantly reduce the burden from chronic kidney disease, while also protecting from cardiovascular disease,” Smyth said.

The study was also confirmed by several other organisations. In a different study researchers found that reducing salt intake reduces albuminuria, or excess protein in the urine, a symptom for malfunctioning of kidney.

A different study led by Meg Jardine from The George Institute for International Health, in Australia and her colleagues found nearly 33 percent reduction in alubuminuria in the people who underwent a sodium reduction programme.

While being sceptical, some scientists question the study whether salt reduction in diet would guard against any kidney related diseases or progressive kidney damage.

The study was published in America Society of Nephrology (ASN), in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at ASN Kidney Week Nov11-16, 2014.

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