Raman Puri chairman of LIPD & Lecturer and prof. at Apollo Hospital - The TeCake

In a study conducted Raman Puri, chairman of LIPID Association of India and an interventional cardiologist at Apollo Hospital, found that 23 percent of Delhi teenagers have high Cholesterol levels.

As a part of the study, he has tested samples from 2058 teenagers from the NCR area, and found that females are more susceptible to the condition.

“High prevalence of atherogenic lipid profile (reason behind heart attack and stroke), low HDL levels (good cholesterol) and high body mass index has been noted in the youth population in Delhi and its adjoining areas,” said Raman Puri.

Puri has further revealed high blood cholesterol leads to a several risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) which can lead to heart attack and stroke.

According to the statistics revealed by the Health Ministry,  the average incident age of CAD is 52 years in India as compared to early 70s in Americans.

The study also concluded the fact that out of 5K teenagers 2.3 percent were found overweight meanwhile, 3.8 percent were obese.

Measuring Cholesterol Levels

Everyone age 20 and older should have his or her cholesterol measured at least once every five years. A blood test called a lipoprotein panel can help show whether you’re at risk for coronary heart disease by looking at substances in your blood that carry cholesterol. This blood test is done after a 9-to-12-hour fast (no eating) and gives information about your:

  • Total cholesterol–a measure of the total amount of cholesterol in your blood, including low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.
  • LDL (bad) cholesterol–the main source of cholesterol buildup and blockage in the arteries
  • HDL (good) cholesterol–HDL helps remove cholesterol from your arteries
  • Triglycerides–another form of fat in your blood that can raise your risk for heart disease

Risk Factors

Major Risk Factors That Affect Your LDL Goal

  • Cigarette smoking
  • High blood pressure (140/90 mmHg or higher or on blood pressure medication)
  • Low HDL cholesterol (less than 40 mg/dL)
  • Family history of early heart disease (heart disease in father or brother before age 55; heart disease in mother or sister before age 65)
  • Age (men 45 years or older; women 55 years or older)

What Affects Cholesterol Levels?

A variety of things can affect cholesterol levels. These are things you can do something about:

  • Diet. Saturated fat and cholesterol in the food you eat make your blood cholesterol level rise. Saturated fat is the main problem, but cholesterol in foods also matters. Reducing the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol in your diet helps lower your blood cholesterol level.
  • Weight. Being overweight is a risk factor for heart disease. It also tends to increase your cholesterol. Losing weight can help lower your LDL and total cholesterol levels, as well as raise your HDL and lower your triglyceride levels.
  • Physical Activity. Not being physically active is a risk factor for heart disease. Regular physical activity can help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and raise HDL (good) cholesterol levels. It also helps you lose weight. You should aim to be physically active for 30 minutes on most, if not all, days.
Things outside of your control that also can affect cholesterol levels include:
  • Age and Gender. As women and men get older, their cholesterol levels rise. Before the age of menopause, women have lower total cholesterol levels than men of the same age. After the age of menopause, women’s LDL levels tend to rise.
  • Heredity. Your genes partly determine how much cholesterol your body makes. High blood cholesterol can run in families.

The findings was recently published in the Journal of the American college of cardiology.

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